Cardiologist, Dr. William H. Matthai, Jr., Visits Advanced Cellular Biology

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As part of an ongoing series of medical specialists working with the students in the Advanced Cellular Biology course, Dr. William H. Matthai Jr., Clinical Associate of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania with a specialty in Interventional Cardiology, discussed the anatomy and physiology of the heart. Dr. Matthai followed up a lab done by the students in a previous class with a presentation entitled, “Cardiovascular Response to Exercise in Health and Disease.” Using Ohm’s Law in Medicine, he explained the relationships among vascular resistance, cardiac output and blood pressure in a healthy young woman, a female elite athlete, and a patient with coronary disease. Dr. Matthai is the parent of Alice, Class of 2010, and Charlotte, Class of 2013.

Please view additional photos in the media gallery below.

Dr. Susan Dorfman

Farewell to Baldwin, but not to Sisterhood

As elected Class speaker, Leah Silverman ’12 recalls the triumphs, challenges and memorable experiences of growing up a Baldwin girl, in her speech to the Class of Blue at the June 7 Commencement ceremony in the Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church.  Read an excerpt from the speech below:

I want to begin not by saying congratulations—those come last—but by saying thank you. I remember nine years ago at my first all school assembly, listening to the then-seniors sing their class song. They seemed so far away.  I thought, I will never be that old, that big. And honestly I haven’t grown that big.  And our grade seems to have gotten smaller. The Class of 2012 seemed foreign, and all I knew at that moment was how uncomfortable a tunic was, that chicken nuggets day was today and for some reason it would be a fight to be first in the lunch line. I could conceive of nothing in the future. I couldn’t imagine what I’d eat for lunch the following day, how could I see myself , here, at commencement, in a white gown as if I were being married off to my future?  It was inconceivable. And somehow, it still is. I want to say thank you, because without brilliant level-headed friends I would have never been able to be present for this moment. Without thirty-six talented girls, I would never have survived nine years of blue and grey challenges. I look at you all, whether in kilts or sweatpants or white gowns, and I see confidence and pride and beauty. I see a perpetual guidance and friendship so blessed that grew into sisterhood… 

To say you impress me every day would be grossly under exaggerated. Ask my mom, how many times I have come home from school exclaiming  about the many merit scholars, artists and athletes, and genuinely good people like all of you.  My mom heard about how witty and smart and special you all are but I think what really spoke to her was how connected I felt to you all. How I would waltz into the door beaming because I had something to say about my friends, someone to brag about, someone to be proud of. Each of you is a force to be reckoned with. We joke about the whole “thinkingirls” thing but it’s true.  You are strong-willed, confident, highly intelligent and beautiful girls that I am lucky to know.  You will give this world so much, you will do so much for this world and for others, you will be accomplished, successful, fulfilled and most of all, happy.  I aspire to have your abilities in math or field hockey or organization.  Whether you were aware of it or not you have inspired me, motivated me, given me confidence and I will be thankful forever.

Thinkingirls. The various definitions sit before me: tall, short, sarcastic, intuitive, creative, to name some. What is it that you all possess that allows Baldwin to shape you into the completed figure of a thinkingirl?… We can be silly and courageous without being foolish. How many high school girls do you know with that sort of organized chaos? Who else but a Baldwin girl could make rebellion look like a diplomatic attempt to test the boundaries of responsibility and  right and wrong? In other words, who else but a thinkingirl could pull off shenanigans with such maturity and grace? Perhaps the pope, or Marilyn Monroe.   
 
 But what is it inside of you that you all have? I think it is just that, the inexplicable imagination and graceful ambition. Inside of you all there is a spirit that sleeps; and as it snores its dreams and it’s whispery motivation trace inside your ears. You can feel this spirit and you can hear it, and perhaps all people have such a spirit, but to become the thinkingirl, you must awaken it. And you all have. You have awoken it with a force and put it to work so that it may never sleep again. Baldwin girls, A perpetual spirit at work. I think that would be too long to put on the website. But I cannot wait to see how you all put it to work the rest of your lives.
  
Success is not an option, it is a destiny. Being a thinkingirl allows for nothing less like matter. Your spirit cannot be destroyed, only changed. And I cannot wait to see how you all implement your spirit differently, ingeniously, and successfully…  

 I can’t say I know everything about every one of you. I can’t say that you know everything about me. And I wonder if sisterhood even means knowing absolutely everything. I think it goes beyond that. I have proof that it does. Proof that sisterhood develops between moments, between chemistry. Sisterhood started when Megan asked me how to spell “mother” during a  quiz in Grade IV, or when in Grade V Michaela advised me to tell my mom that I got a three out of four on my math test instead of a 75 percent.  Sisterhood began in Middle School chorus when I heard for the first time what it meant to truly harmonize, never feeling closer to any one before than I had in that moment when we sang together for our parents before the holidays. Baldwin fosters sisterhood, like a sort of  manure allowing togetherness to blossom. I see white flowers before me today, and in the words of F. Scott Fitzgerald, “You’re the only girls I’ve seen for a long time that actually did look like something blooming.”
 
I remember my first Thanksgiving assembly. I knew none of the words to “the Turkey Ran Away” or the traditional dance moves. I remember lip syncing and pretending I knew the tune. But mostly I remember how it felt, as an observer or outsider, to watch this Baldwin ritual. I felt pride for a school I was not yet completely a part of, and nostalgia for a school not yet my alma-mater. I felt how perfect it all was, how easily I could and would belong. Granted we’ve shared complaints about Baldwin whether it be the ever-changing website or the demanding test board. Standing here though, facing you all, I can say honestly, truly and wholly, that it was so worth it. So worth it… I miss you all already. I wonder how it is that I can be lonesome up here before you all.  Remembering how it began and how it happened and now seeing how it ends, I am lonely. But it’s worth it, so thank you. Thank you. Congratulations, my class of 2012.

A Look at Senior Externships 2012

 
Graduating seniors Elena Saltzman and Mable Bakali peform a scene.

In May, every senior participates in a three week Externship which provides a unique opportunity to explore all kinds of professions, either as a possible career or simply out of general interest. Seniors have worked with judges and doctors, learned to make croissants in a bakery, sung opera in a restaurant, played with children and with animals, and worked in a recording studio.

This year, Leah Silverman and Lauren Cooper wrote, directed, and produced their own plays. During their externship time, they worked with several faculty members on set design and script writing, and got students from several neighboring schools to perform. On the evening of June 6 in the Residence Assembly Room, the girls debuted these plays in front of students, parents, faculty and friends to great acclaim!

 — Pooh Gephart, Upper School Dean of Students

 

 

 

 

 

 

100 Years Ago: “The hand that rocks the cradle…took hold of the guiding reins”

In 1912, the Devon Horse Show held a Women’s Day with women riders and, for the first time, women judges. The New York Times reported that “For sheer novelty at a horse show the situation had certainly never been equaled, and a dubious, somewhat amused but entirely enthusiastic crowd of men turned out to watch the events.”

The words “dubious and amused” have stayed with me. It reminds me of “preposterous extravagance,” the language that was used to describe the Baldwin School’s founding for (gasp) girls.

Personally, I prefer the opening line of The New York Times story of the day: “The hand that rocks the cradle and reaches for the ballot took hold of the guiding reins at 11 o’clock this morning and from then on conducted events in masterly style.”

I salute those women who sat tall in the saddle, albeit side saddle.  I also salute Baldwin students, staff and alumnae, age eight to 84 who have a storied love of riding.

Baldwin’s Kaya Weiser ’22, age eight, an accomplished rider, provided the narration for a look back at the Devon Horse Show which, coincidentally, was founded when the school was eight years old. The Come Along for A Ride two-minute multimedia show was created in partnership with the Show and can be viewed on our website.

Baldwin senior Julia Smith ’12, was part of the Cowtown/Work to Ride team that won the United States Polo Association’s interscholastic national championship for the second straight year. Last year Julia was named “Most Valuable Player” after leading the Work to Ride to victory in the third annual UNICEF Cup in Nigeria, part of the Access Bank Emir of Katsina Charity Shield Polo Tournament. Smith, who has been playing polo since age nine, was the only female on the team – and in the tournament. Julia entered the tournament as a member of the Work to Ride team, a community-based prevention program that aids disadvantaged urban youth though constructive activities centered on horsemanship, equine sports and education.

Julia’s classmate, Rachel Sternberg ’12, earned a National Varsity Letter in Equestrian Activities from the United States Equestrian Federation High School Equestrian Athlete Program. The program is in its third year, and is open to high school equestrian athletes in all breeds and disciplines. Requirements to earn a varsity letter include a logged minimum of 100 hours of equestrian activity and documentation for competing in at least three horse shows within one school calendar year.

Baldwin Alumna, Helen Runeyon Hills ’46, is the author of Still Riding at 80, profiling 20 elder horseback riders and drivers and offering insights in to the physical, emotional and mental challenges they face.  She should know; Ms. Hills has been riding for more than 45 years.

The Baldwin School is a proud sponsor of the 2012 Devon Horse Show.  Join us at the Show on Saturday, May 26, when we will be distributing complimentary general admission tickets to the first 500 children in attendance.

–Fran Feldman Walish, Director of Marketing

 

 

 

 

100 Years Ago: "The hand that rocks the cradle…took hold of the guiding reins"

In 1912, the Devon Horse Show held a Women’s Day with women riders and, for the first time, women judges. The New York Times reported that “For sheer novelty at a horse show the situation had certainly never been equaled, and a dubious, somewhat amused but entirely enthusiastic crowd of men turned out to watch the events.”

The words “dubious and amused” have stayed with me. It reminds me of “preposterous extravagance,” the language that was used to describe the Baldwin School’s founding for (gasp) girls.

Personally, I prefer the opening line of The New York Times story of the day: “The hand that rocks the cradle and reaches for the ballot took hold of the guiding reins at 11 o’clock this morning and from then on conducted events in masterly style.”

I salute those women who sat tall in the saddle, albeit side saddle.  I also salute Baldwin students, staff and alumnae, age eight to 84 who have a storied love of riding.

Baldwin’s Kaya Weiser ’22, age eight, an accomplished rider, provided the narration for a look back at the Devon Horse Show which, coincidentally, was founded when the school was eight years old. The Come Along for A Ride two-minute multimedia show was created in partnership with the Show and can be viewed on our website.

Baldwin senior Julia Smith ’12, was part of the Cowtown/Work to Ride team that won the United States Polo Association’s interscholastic national championship for the second straight year. Last year Julia was named “Most Valuable Player” after leading the Work to Ride to victory in the third annual UNICEF Cup in Nigeria, part of the Access Bank Emir of Katsina Charity Shield Polo Tournament. Smith, who has been playing polo since age nine, was the only female on the team – and in the tournament. Julia entered the tournament as a member of the Work to Ride team, a community-based prevention program that aids disadvantaged urban youth though constructive activities centered on horsemanship, equine sports and education.

Julia’s classmate, Rachel Sternberg ’12, earned a National Varsity Letter in Equestrian Activities from the United States Equestrian Federation High School Equestrian Athlete Program. The program is in its third year, and is open to high school equestrian athletes in all breeds and disciplines. Requirements to earn a varsity letter include a logged minimum of 100 hours of equestrian activity and documentation for competing in at least three horse shows within one school calendar year.

Baldwin Alumna, Helen Runeyon Hills ’46, is the author of Still Riding at 80, profiling 20 elder horseback riders and drivers and offering insights in to the physical, emotional and mental challenges they face.  She should know; Ms. Hills has been riding for more than 45 years.

The Baldwin School is a proud sponsor of the 2012 Devon Horse Show.  Join us at the Show on Saturday, May 26, when we will be distributing complimentary general admission tickets to the first 500 children in attendance.

–Fran Feldman Walish, Director of Marketing

 

 

 

 

2012 Spring Art Exhibition

The 2012 Spring Art Exhibition, which opened on Wednesday, April 18, is the highlight of the year for our student artists, and features a range of media and styles in the gallery spaces and art wing corridors of the Baldwin Residence. Through photography, jewelry, ceramics, drawing, painting, and sculpture, the students are exploring their environments, imaginations, and design skills as well as connecting interests and ideas from other classes. From the beginning freshman classes to the advanced senior studios, the art department is proud to showcase the work of our Baldwin artists. The exhibition runs through May 10.

Janice Wilke, Art Department Head 

 

 

 

 

A Victorious Day

 This month, I along with other Baldwin Service League members and the Diversity Club showed our support for teens with cancer and chronic illness. We concluded a project that had been in the works since Martin Luther King Day, by travelling together to Philadelphia to personally deliver a donation of 80 handmade pillows and $550 to Giselle DiNatale, the founder and president of The Victorious Foundation. 
 
Julia Hopkins '14, Sarah Johnson '12, Karissa Wenk '13, Giselle DiNatale, Madison Noteware '12, Connie Li '13

In March, we co-sponsored a “Banding Together Day,” which was established to raise awareness for teens less fortunate, who were battling cancer and other chronic illnesses. Baldwin Middle and Upper School students purchased and wore the bands to show their support, and to help raise funds for teen programs at children’s hospitals through the Alicia Rose Victorious Foundation (ARVF).

ARVF is dedicated to bringing hope and entertainment to teens that are facing difficult conditions while receiving hospital treatment. The family of Alicia Rose DiNatale, a young teen that fought and lost her battle with cancer, founded the organization in 2002. ARVF strives to help teens once filled with dreams to maintain a sense of connection to their family, friends, and lifestyle while hospitalized.  Approximately 58 ‘teen lounges’ have been funded, both nationally and internationally and over 55,000 critically ill teens and their families have been directly impacted by ARVF’s efforts. In addition, more than 9,000 ‘teen kits’ have been distributed in 90 hospitals within 36 states. This generous donation, made by our student community, will hopefully help establish a new tradition at Baldwin.

 
                                  
 
  — Karissa Wenk ’13, Baldwin Service League member
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Green Week: Thinking Girls Think Twice About H20

Here at Baldwin, we use water constantly without realizing how valuable a commodity it is, or recognizing what we can do to help conserve it.

You may ask, “Why do we need to conserve water?” Water is essential to life on Earth. We need water to grow food, keep clean, provide power, control fire, and last but not least, we need it to survive.

You may be thinking about your personal water use, and wonder, “How much water do I use per day?” The average person uses approximately 70 gallons of water per day (that’s more than enough to fill two big bathtubs). Twenty gallons are used to flush the toilet, 15 gallons for laundry, 14 gallons for running faucets, one gallon for dish water and another 10 gallons as a result of leaky faucets. Then you might ask, “Where does the water go once it leaves my home?” It is treated at a wastewater treatment plant or by your septic system, before being released into the environment.

So what are the most effective ways to conserve water?  There are millions of simple tasks that can be done on a day-to-day basis to conserve water. Here are a few helpful tips the Baldwin community can use:

1. Wash Hands Efficiently: Turn off the water while you soap your hands, and rinse briefly.

2. Brush Teeth Wisely: Turn off the water while you brush your teeth and save four gallons a minute. That’s 200 gallons a week for a family of four.

3. Don’t Waste Drinking Water: Instead of running water to make it cold, keep a pitcher of water in the fridge.

4. Use Less Water for Dishes: Scrape your dishes clean to reduce rinsing. Run the dishwasher only when it’s full.

5. Take Half-Full Baths: Try bathing in a tub that’s only half full to save water and energy used to heat it.

6. Shorten Your Showers: Shorter showers save both energy and water—keeping your shower under five minutes can save up to 1,000 gallons a month!

7. Stop Leaks: Turn off water faucets tightly so they don’t drip. Tell an adult about any leaky faucets you find indoors or outside.

8. Don’t Overwater: Water the lawn only every three to five days in the summer and avoid watering driveways, sidewalks, and gutters.

9. Sweep to Save: Use a broom, rather than a hose, to clean off sidewalks and driveways.

10. Wash Cars Wisely: Use a hose nozzle and turn the water off when soaping up your car. You can save over 100 gallons this way.

To conclude Green Week, check out this short animated film entitled The Story of Bottled Water to get the facts on why this pricey commodity isn’t as tasty or pure as bottled water manufacturers would have us believe. Rather, tap water in a reusable water bottle can save precious resources and reduce the amount of plastic in our landfills.  This is an especially simple switch for our community following today’s generous donation made by Pansini & Mezrow and the Pansini family: a Vapur: The Anti-Bottle for each student, faculty and staff member. We’ll be able to put the bottles to good use with the forthcoming installation of a  new water bottle refilling station on campus, thanks to the continued efforts of my fellow Earth Matter club members in raising over 1,300 dollars in baked bread sales. Stay tuned for the fountain’s official unveiling!

Click here to see today’s slides how presentation about water conservation.

  —Laura Nguyen ‘15, Earth Matters member

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green Week 2012 is a collaboration between Earth Matters (Upper School), Earth Matters Too (Middle School) and the Lower School. This program highlights Baldwin’s commitment to creating a safe and sustainable space for learning.

 

Dramatizing Baldwin

Drama students performing in a short skit entitled "The Crane." Pictured: Anika Iyer, Jessica Zhang, Lauren Fosnocht

It’s that time of year again, and the Middle School drama class’s busiest bees are gearing up for the annual Children’s Theater Production that will be performed for the Lower School on Friday, April 27.

Though the production has traditionally come in the form of a play – with Winnie the Pooh and Peter Rabbit having been performed over the previous two years, the Grade VII and VIII girls decided to set the stage this spring with a show that’s a little more unconventional.  The students involved in the production are currently in the midst of writing a sequence of original scenes, in addition to creating dramatized versions of Aesop’s fables and Shel Silverstein stories that will be performed as short monologues and skits on show day.  The drama students will also design and create their own costumes for each scene.

A retelling of the Grimms fairy tale, "The Golden Goose." Pictured: Anika Iyer, Aquilla Lee, Sydney Atlas

The scenes will be developed around the core themes of selfishness and greed, which lend themselves well in communicating the morals and life lessons that can be learned through reading the familiar children’s fables. The amicable ‘animal’ characters featured in each scene will be key to illustrating human follies.

A scene from Shel Silverstein’s “The Giving Tree.” Pictured: Meg Frantz, Alexis Mosley-McLemore

 One of the scenes performed for the Lower School is taken from the inaugural Middle School Play Slam, to be held in partnership with Episcopal Academy and Villa Maria Academy.  Considered to be the focal piece in the production, visiting British drama intern Joanna Storer has cleverly titled it “I Want…” from “I want…doesn’t get,” a British expression mothers use with their kids when they are behaving selfishly.

Stay tuned for more information on both the Children’s Theater Production and the upcoming Play Slam – an event which will bring together aspiring Upper and Middle School playwrights on May 19 for the opportunity to direct, cast and perform original works.

Green Week 2012: Food for Thought

As day four of Green Week commences at Baldwin,  Earth Matters is educating our community about food — one of the most wasted products in the world. Based on a recent study conducted by the federal Environmental Protection Agency, on average, every person in the United States wastes approximately 200 pounds of food per year. That means that nearly 10 million people could potentially be fed if one-fifth of our food  was not wasted. Today, we are urging people to be more mindful of the amount of food they throw away.

People often buy their food from large companies as opposed to sourcing it from local markets.  This adds to the energy and resources needed to transport it over long distances, causing irreparable damage to the environment.

During lunch today, there will be a showing of the documentary, ‘Food Inc.,’ which examines corporate farming – a business which has received widespread condemnation for producing unhealthy food using methods which are both inhumane and environmentally unsustainable.  We will also host a bake sale to raise money for future ‘green’ projects on campus, and give burritos to students. The burritos have been donated by Chipotle, a food company that is actively engaged in supporting family farmers, sourcing local and organic ingredients, and promoting sustainably raised food.

Click here to view today’s slideshow on food waste.

 — Laura Noteware ’15, Earth Matters member

 

 

 

 

 

Green Week 2012 is a collaboration between Earth Matters (Upper School), Earth Matters Too (Middle School) and the Lower School. This program highlights Baldwin’s commitment to creating a safe and sustainable space for learning.